Haunted Futures available for pre-order

Ghostwoods Books’ Haunted Futures, featuring Warren Ellis, Tricia Sullivan, Jeff Noon, Liesel Schwarz, Felicity Shoulders, SL Huang, and me, is coming in May.

The book is now available for pre-order via:

  • Amazon.com
  • Amazon.co.uk
  • Barnes & Noble
  • foyle’s
  •  

    Haunted Futures coming soon from Ghostwoods Books

    A new Greenwood story (first two published in Black Wings V and Uncertainties Vol 1) will be part of Ghostwoods Books’ forthcoming HAUNTED FUTURES anthology.

    It’s a treacherous region, the future.

    You can’t see far, and the footing is uncertain at best. Ghosts and phantoms stalk the haze around you, and their chittering will lead you astray. There are no maps to this territory, but sometimes a brave soul strides out ahead into the haunted shadows. Those who return to the campfire of the now often bear tales of the visions seared into their minds while they were out there, in the mists.

    We have scoured the earth for these most daring of travelers – the ones who have ventured out into the future and returned wraith-laden. Fifteen of them agreed to share their stories. Their enthralling accounts will seize you, and you might find it difficult to fight free of them afterwards, but any risks are overshadowed by the dazzling wonders that await. So muster your courage, and dive into the pages. Haunted Futures of all kinds await you, with open arms and suspiciously toothy smiles.

    John interviewed in Scream issue 37

    Cover37bannerP. M. Buchan (Bucky, we call him) interviewed me for his regular Horror Comics bit in the always horrible (in a good way) Scream Magazine #37.

    In the interview I talk about Ghost Stories of an Antiquary Vol 1, H. P. Lovecraft, and my Greenwood writing, among other things. I also seem to have acquired a new nickname, which I’m not sure I’m happy with…

    john scream

    The print edition is already sold out on the Scream website, but if you’re in the UK you can pick up copies in HMV among other places. You can also get digital copies via magzter.com

    Black Wings V available to pre-order now

    S. T. Joshi’s Black Wings V is coming out next month and I’m very pleased and proud to say that I have a story in it. The Black Abbess is the first of three Weird Fiction stories of mine set in the Greenwood region of north west England which are being published this year (the other two are in Uncertainties: Twenty-two Strange Stories, and Haunted Futures). I talked a little bit about Greenwood in my Hannah’s Bookshelf guest spot last week, and it’s a topic I hope to be discussing further in the coming months. This is sort of the start of a new chapter in my writing career so, if you’re a fan of Weird Fiction, Folk Horror, Strange Tales, and all the rest of that stuff, I really hope you’ll check these stories out.

    black-wings-vAN ANTHOLOGY edited by S. T. Joshi
    CATEGORY Lovecraft inspired Horror
    PUBLICATION DATE May 2015
    COVER ART Jason Van Hollander
    PAGES 317
    INTRODUCTION S. T. Joshi

    EDITIONS
    Unsigned Jacketed Hardcover — ISBN 978-1-848639-94-2 [£25]

    300 Slipcased JHC signed by the contributors — ISBN 978-1-848639-95-9 [£50]

    SYNOPSIS
    This fifth instalment of S. T. Joshi’s critically acclaimed Black Wings series features twenty stories that use H. P. Lovecraft’s mythos as the basis for imaginative ventures into the weird and terrifying. One of the central themes in Lovecraft’s work is the problematical nature of science in human affairs, and in this volume we find stories by Caitlín R. Kiernan, Lynne Jamneck, and Donald R. Burleson where scientists come face to face with the appalling implications of their discoveries.

    Lovecraft was a master of the “sense of place,” inventing imaginary towns in New England with a rich and sinister history stretching back centuries. In this book, Jonathan Thomas, W. H. Pugmire, and Sunni K Brock bring Lovecraft’s towns of Arkham, Kingsport, and Innsmouth to life. Sam Gafford, Darrell Schweitzer, and Stephen Woodworth evoke terror in other corners of the American continent, while British writers David Hambling and John Reppion find Lovecraftian horror in little-known towns in England. The world-building that led Lovecraft to fashion an entire universe set in the realm of dreams is duplicated in tales by Cody Goodfellow, Mark Howard Jones, and Donald Tyson.

    Madness is always an occupational hazard of the “searchers after horror” who populate Lovecraft’s tales. In this volume, stories by Robert H. Waugh, Nicole Cushing, and Nancy Kilpatrick searingly display the psychological aberrations of characters as they encounter the bizarre. Lovecraft himself has become an iconic character, and his gaunt, lantern-jawed figure stalks the tales by Jason C. Eckhardt and Mollie L. Burleson. This volume concludes, as did its predecessor, with a long poem by Wade German, one of the most dynamic figures in a remarkable renaissance of weird poetry inspired by the work of Lovecraft and his colleagues.
    Black Wings V can take its place as a pioneering anthology that shows how the work of H. P. Lovecraft is inexhaustibly rich in the inspiration it can provide to contemporary writers of weird fiction.